How Much Is a Challenge Worth?

When the Hawkeye line-calling system is available, tennis players are given the right to make three incorrect challenges per set. As with any situation involving scarcity, there’s a choice to make: Take the chance of getting a call overturned, or make sure to keep your options open for later?

We’ve learned over the last several years that human line-calling is pretty darn good, so players don’t turn to Hawkeye that often. At the Australian Open this year, men challenged fewer than nine calls per match–well under three per set or, put another way, less than 1.5 challenges per player per set. Even at that low rate of fewer than once per thirty points, players are usually wrong. Only about one in three calls are overturned.

So while challenges are technically scarce, they aren’t that scarce.  It’s a rare match in which a player challenges so often and is so frequently incorrect that he runs out. That said, it does happen, and while running out of challenges is low-probability, it’s very high risk. Getting a call overturned at a crucial moment could be the difference between winning and losing a tight match. Most of the time, challenges seem worthless, but in certain circumstances, they can be very valuable indeed.

Just how valuable? That’s what I hope to figure out. To do so, we’ll need to estimate the frequency with which players miss opportunities to overturn line calls because they’ve exhausted their challenges, and we’ll need to calculate the potential impact of failing to overturn those calls.

A few notes before we get any further.  The extra challenge awarded to each player at the beginning of a tiebreak would make the analysis much more daunting, so I’ve ignored both that extra challenge and points played in tiebreaks. I suspect it has little effect on the results. I’ve limited this analysis to the ATP, since men challenge more frequently and get calls overturned more often. And finally, this is a very complex, sprawling subject, so we often have to make simplifying assumptions or plug in educated guesses where data isn’t available.

Running out of challenges

The Australian Open data mentioned above is typical for ATP challenges. It is very similar to a subset of Match Charting Project data, suggesting that both challenge frequency and accuracy are about the same across the tour as they are in Melbourne.

Let’s assume that each player challenges a call roughly once every sixty points, or 1.7%. Given an approximate success rate of 30%, each player makes an incorrect challenge on about 1.2% of points and a correct challenge on 0.5% of points. Later on, I’ll introduce a different set of assumptions so we can see what different parameters do to the results.

Running out of challenges isn’t in itself a problem. We’re interested in scenarios when a player not only exhausts his challenges, but when he also misses an opportunity to overturn a call later in the set. These situations are much less common than all of those in which a player might want to contest a call, but we don’t care about the 70% of those challenges that would be wrong, as they wouldn’t have any effect on the outcome of the match.

For each possible set length, from 24-point golden sets up to 93-point marathons, I ran a Monte Carlo simulation, using the assumptions given above, to determine the probability that, in a set of that length, a player would miss a chance to overturn a later call. As noted above, I’ve excluded tiebreaks from this analysis, so I counted only the number of points up to 6-6. I also excluded all “advantage” fifth sets.

For example, the most common set length in the data set is 57 points, which occured 647 times. In 10,000 simulations, a player missed a chance to overturn a call 0.27% of the time. The longer the set, the more likely that challenge scarcity would become an issue. In 10,000 simulations of 85-point sets, players ran out of challenges more than three times as often. In 0.92% of the simulations, a player was unable to challenge a call that would have been overturned.

These simulations are simple, assuming that each point is identical. Of course, players are aware of the cap on challenges, so with only one challenge remaining, they may be less likely to contest a “probably correct” call, and they would be very unlikely to use a challenge to earn a few extra seconds of rest. Further, the fact that players sometimes use Hawkeye for a bit of a break suggests that what we might call “true” challenges–instances in which the player believes the original call was wrong–are a bit less frequent that the numbers we’re using. Ultimately, we can’t address these concerns without a more complex model and quite a bit of data we don’t have.

Back to the results. Taking every possible set length and the results of the simulation for each one, we find the average player is likely to run out of challenges and miss a chance to overturn a call roughly once every 320 sets, or 0.31% of the time. That’s not very often–for almost all players, it’s less than once per season.

The impact of (not) overturning a call

Just because such an outcome is infrequent doesn’t necessarily mean it isn’t important. If a low-probability event has a high enough impact when it does occur, it’s still worth planning for.

Toward the end of a set, when most of these missed chances would occur, points can be very important, like break point at 5-6. But other points are almost meaningless, like 40-0 in just about any game.

To estimate the impact of these missed opportunities, I ran another set of Monte Carlo simulations. (This gets a bit hairy–bear with me.) For each set length, for those cases when a player ran out of challenges, I found the average number of points at which he used his last challenge. Then, for each run of the simulation, I took a random set from the last few years of ATP data with the corresponding number of points, chose a random point between the average time that the challenges ran out and the end of the set, and measured the importance of that point.

To quantify the importance of the point, I calculated three probabilities from the perspective of the player who lost the point and, had he conserved his challenges, could have overturned it:

  1. his odds of winning the set before that point was played
  2. his odds of winning the set after that point was played (and not overturned)
  3. his odds of winning the set had the call been overturned and the point awarded to him.

(To generate these probabilities, I used my win probability code posted here with the assumption that each player wins 65% of his service points. The model treats points as independent–that is, the outcome of one point does not depend on the outcomes of previous points–which is not precisely true, but it’s close, and it makes things immensely more straightforward. Alert readers will also note that I’ve ignored the possibility of yet another call that could be overturned. However, the extremely low probability of that event convinced me to avoid the additional complexity required to model it.)

Given these numbers, we can calculate the possible effects of the challenge he couldn’t make. The difference between (2) and (3) is the effect if the call would’ve been overturned and awarded to him. The difference between (1) and (2) is the effect if the point would have been replayed. This is essentially the same concept as “leverage index” in baseball analytics.

Again, we’re missing some data–I have no idea what percentage of overturned calls result in each of those two outcomes. For today, we’ll say it’s half and half, so to boil down the effect of the missed challenge to a single number, we’ll average those two differences.

For example, let’s say we’re at five games all, and the returner wins the first point of the 11th game. The server’s odds of winning the set have decreased from 50% (at 5-all, love-all) to 43.0%. If the server got the call overturned and was awarded the point, his odds would increase to 53.8%. Thus, the win probability impact of overturning the call and taking the point is 10.8%, while the effect of forcing a replay is 7.0%. For the purposes of this simulation, we’re averaging these two numbers and using 8.9% as the win probability impact of this missed opportunity to challenge.

Back to the big picture. For each set length, I ran 1,000 simulations like what I’ve described above and averaged the results. In short sets under 40 points, the win probability impact of the missed challenge is less than five percentage points. The longer the set, the bigger the effect: Long sets are typically closer and the points tend to be higher-leverage. In 85-point sets, for instance, the average effect of the missed challenge is a whopping 20 percentage points–meaning that if a player more skillfully conserved his challenges in five such sets, he’d be able to reverse the outcome of one of them.

On average, the win probability effect of the missed challenge is 12.4 percentage points. In other words, better challenge management would win a player one more set for every eight times he didn’t lose such an opportunity by squandering his challenges.

The (small) big picture

Let’s put together the two findings. Based on our assumptions, players run out of challenges and forgo a chance to overturn a later call about once every 320 matches. We now know that the cost of such a mistake is, on average, a 12.4 percentage point win probability hit.

Thus, challenge management costs an average player one set out of every 2600. Given that many matches are played on clay or on courts without Hawkeye, that’s maybe once in a career. As long as the assumptions I’ve used are in the right ballpark, the effect isn’t even worth talking about. The mental cost of a player thinking more carefully before challenging might be greater than this exceedingly unlikely benefit.

What if some of the assumptions are wrong? Anecdotally, it seems like challenges cluster in certain matches, because of poor officiating, bad lighting, extreme spin, precise hitting, or some combination of these. It seems possible that certain scenarios would arise in which a player would want to challenge much more frequently, and even though he might gain some accuracy, he would still increase the risk.

I ran the same algorithms for what seems to me to be an extreme case, almost doubling the frequency with which each player challenges, to 3.0%, and somewhat increasing the accuracy rate, to 40%.

With these parameters, a player would run out of challenges and miss an opportunity to overturn a call about six times more often–once every 54 sets, or 1.8% of the time. The impact of each of these missed opportunities doesn’t change, so the overall result also increases by a factor of six. In these extreme case, poor challenge management would cost a player the set 0.28% of the time, or once every 356 sets. That’s a less outrageous number, representing perhaps one set every second year, but it also applies to unusual sets of circumstances which are very unlikely to follow a player to every match.

It seems clear that three challenges is enough. Even in long sets, players usually don’t run out, and when they do, it’s rare that they miss an opportunity that a fourth challenge would have afforded them. The effect of a missed chance can be enormous, but they are so infrequent that players would see little or no benefit from tactically conserving challenges.