Toward a Better Understanding of Return Effectiveness

The deeper the return, the better, right? That, at least, is the basis for many of the flashy graphics we see these days on tennis broadcasts, indicating the location of every return, often separated into “shallow,” “medium,” and “deep” zones.

In general, yes, deep returns are better than shallow ones. But return winners aren’t overwhelmingly deep, since returners can achieve sharper angles if they aim closer to the service line. There are plenty of other complicating factors as well: returns to the sides of the court are more effective than those down the middle, second-serve returns tend to be better than first-serve returns, and topspin returns result in more return points won than chip or slice returns.

While most of this is common sense, quantifying it is an arduous and mind-bending task. When we consider all these variables–first or second serve, deuce or ad court, serve direction, whether the returner is a righty or lefty, forehand or backhand return, topspin or slice, return direction, and return depth–we end up with more than 8,500 permutations. Many are useless (righties don’t hit a lot of forehand chip returns against deuce court serves down the T), but thousands reflect some common-enough scenario.

To get us started, let’s set aside all of the variables but one. When we analyze 600+ ATP matches in the Match Charting Project data, we have roughly 61,000 in-play returns coded in one of nine zones, including at least 2,000 in each.  Here is a look at the impact of return location, showing the server’s winning percentage when a return comes back in play to one of the nine zones:rzones1show

(“Shallow” is defined as anywhere inside the service boxes, while “Medium” and “Deep” each represent half of the area behind the service boxes. The left, center, and right zones are intended to indicate roughly where the return would cross the baseline, so for sharply angled shots, a return might bounce shallow near the middle of the court but be classified as a return to the forehand or backhand side.)

As we would expect, deeper returns work in favor of the returner, as do returns away from the center of the court. A bit surprisingly, returns to the server’s forehand side (if he’s a right-hander) are markedly more effective than those to the backhand. This is probably because right-handed returners are most dangerous when hitting crosscourt forehands, although left-handed returners are also more effective (if not as dramatically) when returning to that side of the court.

Let’s narrow things down just a little and see how the impact of return location differs on first and second serves. Here are the server’s chances of winning the point if a first-serve return comes back in each of the nine zones:

rzones2showF

And the same for second-serve returns:

rzones3showF

It’s worth emphasizing just how much impact a deep return can have. So many points are won with unreturnable serves–even seconds–that simply getting the ball back in play comes close to making the point a 50/50 proposition. A deep second-serve return, especially to a corner, puts the returner in a very favorable position. Consistently hitting returns like that is a big reason why Novak Djokovic essentially turns his opponents’ second serves against them.

The final map makes it clear how valuable it is to move the server away from the middle of the court. Think of it as a tactical first strike, forcing the server to play defensively instead of dictating play with his second shot. Among second-serve returns put in play, any ball placed away from the middle of the court–regardless of depth–gives the returner a better chance of winning the point than does a deep return down the middle.

For today, I’m going to stop here. This is just the tip of the iceberg, as there are so many variables that play some part in the effectiveness of various service returns. Ultimately, understanding the potency of each return location will give us additional insight into what players can achieve with different kinds of serve, which players are deadliest with certain types of returns, and how best to handle different returns with the server’s crucial second shot.

One thought on “Toward a Better Understanding of Return Effectiveness”

  1. Hi Jeff,
    Really liked this piece. It gives a simple lesson: try to return more to the side, but now we have data that proves this is better.
    After reading this watching the players return serve hasn’t been the same.
    Hope your planning on writing more articles like this one.
    Thanks

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