The Difficulty (and Importance) of Finding the Backhand

One disadvantage of some one-handed backhands is that they tend to sit up a little more when they’re hit crosscourt. That gives an opponent more time to prepare and, often, enough time to run around a crosscourt shot and hit a forehand, which opens up more tactical possibilities.

With the 700 men’s matches in the Match Charting Project database (please contribute!), we can start to quantify this disadvantage–if indeed it has a negative effect on one-handers. Once we’ve determined whether one-handers can find their opponents’ backhands, we can try to answer the more important question of how much it matters.

The scenario

Let’s take all baseline rallies between right-handers. Your opponent hits a shot to your backhand side, and you have three choices: drive (flat or topspin) backhand, slice backhand, or run around to hit a forehand. You’ll occasionally go for a winner down the line and you’ll sometimes be forced to hit a weak reply down the middle, but usually, your goal is to return the shot crosscourt, ideally finding your opponent’s backhand.

Considering all righty-righty matchups including at least one player among the last week’s ATP top 72 (I wanted to include Nicolas Almagro), here are the frequency and results of each of those choices:

SHOT    FREQ  FH REP  BH REP    UFE  WINNER  PT WON  
ALL             9.9%   68.1%  10.8%    5.8%   43.1%  
SLICE  11.9%   34.1%   49.5%   7.1%    0.6%   40.2%  
FH     44.9%    2.8%   69.0%  13.0%    9.8%   42.1%  
BH     43.3%   10.7%   72.2%   9.5%    3.1%   45.0%  
                                                     
1HBH   42.6%   12.0%   69.5%   9.3%    3.8%   44.2%  
2HBH   43.5%   10.0%   73.4%   9.6%    2.8%   45.4%

“FH REP” and “BH REP” refer to a forehand or backhand reply, and we can see just how much shot selection matters in keeping the ball away from your opponent’s forehand. A slice does a very poor job, while an inside-out forehand almost guarantees a backhand reply, though it comes with an increased risk of error.

The differences between one- and two-handed backhands aren’t as stark. One-handers don’t find the backhand quite as frequently, though they hit a few more winners. They hit drive backhands a bit less often, but that doesn’t necessarily mean they are hitting forehands instead. On average, two-handers hit a few more forehands from the backhand corner, while one-handers are forced to hit more slices.

One hand, many types

Not all one-handed backhands are created equal, and these numbers bear that out. Stanislas Wawrinka‘s backhand is as effective as the best two-handers, while Roger Federer‘s is typically the jumping-off point for discussions of why the one-hander is dying.

Here are the 28 players for whom we have at least 500 instances (excluding service returns) when the player responded to a shot hit to his backhand corner. For each, I’ve shown how often he chose a drive backhand or forehand, and the frequency with which he found the backhand–excluding his own errors and winners.

Player                 BH  BH FRQ  FIND BH%  FH FRQ  FIND BH%  
Alexandr Dolgopolov     2   45.7%     94.2%   43.3%     98.7%  
Kei Nishikori           2   51.1%     94.0%   38.9%     98.1%  
Andy Murray             2   41.0%     92.4%   46.5%     98.6%  
Stanislas Wawrinka      1   48.6%     92.1%   37.5%     98.0%  
Bernard Tomic           2   33.8%     91.7%   43.8%     97.9%  
Novak Djokovic          2   47.2%     91.7%   41.4%     98.5%  
Kevin Anderson          2   41.0%     91.5%   45.8%     96.6%  
Borna Coric             2   46.5%     90.7%   44.2%     96.9%  
Pablo Cuevas            1   41.9%     90.6%   54.5%     96.5%  
Marin Cilic             2   45.4%     89.7%   43.3%     97.2%  
                                                               
Player                 BH  BH FRQ  FIND BH%  FH FRQ  FIND BH%  
Tomas Berdych           2   41.6%     89.3%   44.2%     97.5%  
Pablo Carreno Busta     2   55.4%     87.8%   41.1%     93.5%  
Fabio Fognini           2   46.0%     87.4%   47.0%     96.1%  
Richard Gasquet         1   57.2%     87.3%   32.1%     96.8%  
Andreas Seppi           2   40.3%     87.2%   50.0%     93.9%  
Nicolas Almagro         1   53.6%     86.5%   39.3%     98.0%  
Dominic Thiem           1   38.5%     86.2%   50.0%     96.5%  
Gael Monfils            2   48.0%     85.3%   46.3%     85.3%  
David Ferrer            2   48.2%     84.9%   40.4%     97.1%  
Roger Federer           1   42.7%     84.8%   43.6%     94.5%  
                                                               
Player                 BH  BH FRQ  FIND BH%  FH FRQ  FIND BH%  
Gilles Simon            2   46.9%     84.6%   46.5%     94.6%  
David Goffin            2   45.4%     84.6%   45.7%     94.9%  
Roberto Bautista Agut   2   39.6%     83.3%   46.7%     98.4%  
Jo Wilfried Tsonga      2   43.5%     82.0%   44.5%     96.3%  
Grigor Dimitrov         1   41.4%     78.6%   39.4%     92.8%  
Milos Raonic            2   31.5%     63.5%   56.5%     94.3%  
Jack Sock               2   27.0%     62.5%   62.9%     96.3%  
Tommy Robredo           1   26.6%     56.1%   62.3%     88.4%

One-handers Wawrinka, Pablo Cuevas, and Richard Gasquet (barely) are among the top half of these players, in terms of finding the backhand with their own backhand. Federer and his would-be clone Grigor Dimitrov are at the other end of the spectrum.

Taking all 60 righties I included in this analysis (not just those shown above), there is a mild negative correlation (r^2 = -0.16) between a player’s likelihood of finding the opponent’s backhand with his own and the rate at which he chooses to hit a forehand from that corner. In other words, the worse he is at finding the backhand, the more inside-out forehands he hits. Tommy Robredo and Jack Sock are the one- and two-handed poster boys for this, struggling more than any other players to find the backhand, and compensating by hitting as many forehands as possible.

However, Federer–and, to an even greater extent, Dimitrov–don’t fit this mold. The average one-hander runs around balls in their backhand corner 44.6% of the time, while Fed is one percentage point under that and Dimitrov is below 40%. Federer is perceived to be particularly aggressive with his inside-out (and inside-in) forehands, but that may be because he chooses his moments wisely.

Ultimate outcomes

Let’s look at this from one more angle. In the end, what matters is whether you win the point, no matter how you get there. For each of the 28 players listed above, I calculated the rate at which they won points for each shot selection. For instance, when Novak Djokovic hits a drive backhand from his backhand corner, he wins the point 45.4% of the time, compared to 42.3% when he hits a slice and 42.4% when he hits a forehand.

Against his own average, Djokovic is about 3.6% better when he chooses (or to think of it another way, is able to choose) a drive backhand. For all of these players, here’s how each of the three shot choices compare to their average outcome:

Player                 BH   BH W   SL W   FH W  
Dominic Thiem           1  1.209  0.633  0.924  
David Goffin            2  1.111  0.656  0.956  
Grigor Dimitrov         1  1.104  0.730  1.022  
Gilles Simon            2  1.097  0.922  0.913  
Tomas Berdych           2  1.085  0.884  0.957  
Pablo Carreno Busta     2  1.081  0.982  0.892  
Kei Nishikori           2  1.070  0.777  0.965  
Roberto Bautista Agut   2  1.055  0.747  1.027  
Stanislas Wawrinka      1  1.050  0.995  0.936  
Borna Coric             2  1.049  1.033  0.941  
                                                
Player                 BH   BH W   SL W   FH W  
Bernard Tomic           2  1.049  1.037  0.943  
Jack Sock               2  1.049  0.811  1.010  
Gael Monfils            2  1.048  1.100  0.938  
Fabio Fognini           2  1.048  0.775  0.987  
Milos Raonic            2  1.048  0.996  0.974  
Nicolas Almagro         1  1.046  0.848  0.964  
Kevin Anderson          2  1.038  1.056  0.950  
Novak Djokovic          2  1.036  0.966  0.969  
Andy Murray             2  1.031  1.039  0.962  
Roger Federer           1  1.023  1.005  0.976  
                                                
Player                 BH   BH W   SL W   FH W  
Richard Gasquet         1  1.020  0.795  1.033  
Andreas Seppi           2  1.019  0.883  1.008  
David Ferrer            2  1.018  0.853  1.020  
Alexandr Dolgopolov     2  1.010  1.010  0.987  
Marin Cilic             2  1.006  1.009  0.991  
Pablo Cuevas            1  0.987  0.425  1.048  
Jo Wilfried Tsonga      2  0.956  0.805  1.095  
Tommy Robredo           1  0.845  0.930  1.079

In this view, Dimitrov–along with his fellow one-handed flame carrier Dominic Thiem–looks a lot better. His crosscourt backhand doesn’t find many backhands, but it is by far his most effective shot from his own backhand corner. We would expect him to win more points with a drive backhand than with a slice (since he probably opts for slices in more defensive positions), but it’s surprising to me that his backhand is so much better than the inside-out forehand.

While Dimitrov and Thiem are more extreme than most, almost all of these players have better results with crosscourt drive backhands than with inside-out (or inside-in forehands). Only five–including Robredo but, shockingly, not including Sock–win more points after hitting forehands from the backhand corner.

It’s clear that one-handers do, in fact, have a slightly more difficult time forcing their opponents to hit backhands. It’s much less clear how much it matters. Even Federer, with his famously dodgy backhand and even more famously dominant inside-out forehand, is slightly better off hitting a backhand from his backhand corner. We’ll never know what would happen if Fed had Djokovic’s backhand instead, but even though Federer’s one-hander isn’t finding as many backhands as Novak’s two-hander does, it’s getting the job done at a surprisingly high rate.

9 thoughts on “The Difficulty (and Importance) of Finding the Backhand”

  1. So if i understand this well, it’s actually better to hit bh’s from the bh corner,then to run around it and try to hit as many fh’s as possible?

    1. It seems that way, yes. I’m very hesitant to draw conclusions like that, since it seems that it should be the opposite and players should generally know what the best tactics are, but … given how much time players have when they run around to hit a FH, I would expect them to hit a *better* than average backhand. So if their average backhand is better their average forehand from that corner, that’s an even stronger argument in favor of the backhand.

  2. That Sock number is very surprising. Too many errors over there?

    The Gasquet difference also surprises me. It is small, but ask someone generally if Gasquet’s backhand crosscourt creates winners at a higher rate than his inside out forehand, and I’m guessing most would give a resounding “yes.”

    Also, is there a lesson here for Berdych? This guy just can’t get to the next level, but it looks like he is hitting more inside out forehands than backhands when the ball is in his backhand corner. Granted, those inside out forehands are finding his opponents’ backhands at a very high rate (and more so than his backhand does), but the last chart shows a much higher success rate on the backhand than the inside out forehand. He can really crack either shot (not sure anyone on tour hits harder than he does), so may be he should stop running around his backhand. Although he played well in Paris, it sure seemed like he made a lot of inside out forehand errors against Djokovic, but then, that’s perhaps a bad example, since Djokovic forces players to go for too much.

    1. yeah, tons of errors for sock. 14% of FHs from that corner are UFEs. That’s not the highest of all players, but it’s close.

      You might be right about Berdych. It may be (for him and others) that top players are just too good at handling i-o forehands. The FH gives you more winners, but when it doesn’t, the court position cost isn’t worth it.

  3. Jeff, really interesting post and charts!

    Just from a court position perspective, if you opt to run around your backhand and hit a forehand in the backhand corner, you’re giving up a lot of court position and giving yourself a lot of court to cover. If you have any sort of confidence in your backhand, it’s probably best to use it on and work the point a little bit more. The alternative is to hit a pretty aggressive shot that will for most players be a lower percentage play.

    I’d be curious to see Nadal’s numbers (I know, not too many lefty-lefty matchups for this particular study) as he’s someone who I would expect to hit a high percentage of forehands from the backhand side. There was a good stretch in maybe 2013 / 14 where he’d be content to hit forehands in the backhand doubles alley. Though lately (from recollection) he’s seemed to be doing that a lot less. I think his backhand has improved considerably from earlier in the year.

    More than anything, I love the backhand frequency chart. It really speaks to a player’s confidence / ability to hit a backhand at all. Sock’s numbers are hilariously low. Are there any Steve Johnson matches charted before/after he’s been employing the slice? Would be really curious to see the numbers on that as well.

    1. Thanks!

      Yep, that’s the argument against running around BH … but players (especially on clay) seem to the think that the benefit — opening up more angles by hitting the forehand — is worth the trade. Seems like in some cases you’re right, and it’s not worth it.

      Yeah, extremely few L-L matchups, and without much evidence, I think that lefties have a whole different set of tactics than righties do because they’re playing righties most of the time.

      Looks like all the charted Johnson matches are post-slice.

  4. Hi, I don’t quite understand something in last set of data you have above. Does the data mean that if a player hits a shot from his or her backhand corner AT ANY POINT in a rally and wins the rally, then it counts towards that data? Because wouldn’t an inside-out forehand serve a different purpose in a rally compared to a cross court backhand? For example, for Roger Federer, the data further above says that if he hits an inside-out forehand, then he’ll have a greater chance of finding his opponent’s backhand–this is probably the biggest reason he likes to hit an inside-out forehand. This is pretty independent of whether he wins a rally or not of course, although there’s probably some kind of correlation.

  5. Hi Jeff,

    I like this look on the stats of finding the backhand. Do you have data of 1. lefty to lefty or 2. lefty to righty. I would assume the data would show the lefties ability to hit the righty BH corner to be greater?

    Any input on this would be great as i work with quite a few lefties.

Comments are closed.